Writing retreat at Moniack Mhor by Hannah Foster

Website: http://thecaledonianovelaward.com

Little did I know, when writing Take Flight, which is set in a drought-stricken Australian landscape, that I’d end up editing it in a place almost the polar opposite. Moniack Mhor Creative Writing Centre, in the lush Scottish Highlands, became my home for a week after winning The Caledonia Novel Award’s special prize for best novel from the UK and Ireland.

I chose a Fiction writing course tutored by Kevin MacNeil and Tiffany Murray, with Patrick Gale as our special mid-week guest. I knew I was choosing a course with brilliant writers as tutors, but what I didn’t know, or entirely expect, was how much I’d bond with the incredible and supportive group of students attending the course.

On the first evening, after a hearty dinner prepared by the Centre’s staff, Kevin led all of the students through an introductory writing exercise. It is quite a vulnerable thing to do, to share something you’ve written with a group of strangers. I was nervous that first night. But my fear was misplaced. Everyone had chosen to do the course for different reasons – from finishing a novel to writing creative prose for the first time – but each person was similar in their generosity of spirit and their passion for creativity.

I had originally thought I’d spend most of the week in my room or tucked away by a window, writing. And I did spend many hours at the little desk in my room, which had a beautiful view of the ‘Hobbit House’ and fields beyond. But, more important than the words I wrote, were the many hours I spent in tutorials, one-to-ones, readings and informally with other students improving the quality of my writing. I learnt to think about scenes differently, to review and edit dialogue critically, and I wrote down so many little tips that, though they seem obvious now, I had either forgotten or had not occurred to me before. On top of this, each day involved hearing people read their stories. Both tutors and students shared their work; some of it funny, some sad, some polished and some very raw and new. Each day I glimpsed a slice of an individual’s fantastic world, or was dragged back in history or granted entry to the most private of moments. It was bliss!

I’d like to say a huge thank you to The Caledonia Novel Award for this very special prize. I’m so thankful that the Award teamed up with Moniack Mhor to offer a place on one of their retreats, because, for a writer, time and space to write is just about the best thing you could possibly offer. For anyone considering entering the Award this year, I would say: just sit down, write those words and make it happen. Make this year the year you write a novel!

Dubai - up high! by Hannah Foster

An adult Disneyland with sand – Dubai is crazy, hot and crazy hot with a lot of things I expected (malls, air conditioning, middle eastern food, Lamborghinis, very tall buildings) and a few things I absolutely did not (brilliant brunch, French supermarkets, nightclubs and Starbucks)

London to Dubai is a relatively easy 7-hour daytime flight. I’m used to Dubai being an airport stopover, marking one leg of a fairly brutal 22 or so hour flight to Australia.  But when you get to get off and stay off the plane in Dubai, it is definitely much more civilised!

As we were staying with family (and meeting the newest member of it!) we had a brilliant time in Dubai and got to see a less touristy and more interesting side of this city on the Persian Gulf of the UAE .

We did manage to do a few touristy things though including…the world’s highest high tea! It is me we are talking about after all; I will wrangle eating cake into the itinerary of any trip.

The world’s highest high tea is served at Atmosphere, on level 122 of the world’s tallest building, the Burj Khalifa. You really feel like a celebrity or fabulously wealthy oil baron from the moment you pass through the doors of the Armani hotel lobby on ground floor. Hostesses in floor-length black dresses greet guests, and lift access is guarded by discretely placed Armani suited security. The lift up to level 122 takes less than a minute, but there is a lot of ear popping and a slightly disconcerting wobble to the lift as you reach the higher floors.

Floor to ceiling windows, with an ocean-side view

Floor to ceiling windows, with an ocean-side view

Atmosphere has the wood paneled, crisp linen thing that many modern premier high tea venues have, but it also has an incredible panoramic view of Dubai and the desert beyond from almost half a kilometre up. There is glass from floor to ceiling in the dining area and there’s also an epic view from the bathrooms. Service is very attentive, bordering on gushing, and, on request, extends to enthusiastically taking twenty different photos of you having high tea from various angles.

High tea is served on a tiered stand (tick) and includes warm scones (tick) with jam and proper clotted cream (double tick), tiny fancy sandwiches and a selection of French style cakes.

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There are a few subtle nods to the fact that you’re in the Middle East. The high tea starts with a glass of iced tea, which makes sense given it is typically over 40 degrees outside, and palate cleansing coconut milk mousse. The selection of gateaux also included a hot weather friendly coconut macaron and the scones were served with a tropical style passionfruit jam, as well as the traditional berry jam.

Lady Bracknell and I are both very fond of cucumber sandwiches, luckily for me there were some on hand at this high tea!

Lady Bracknell and I are both very fond of cucumber sandwiches, luckily for me there were some on hand at this high tea!

Particular standouts for me were the cucumber sandwiches, which were actually perfect slices of white bread with cream cheese layered in the middle, wrapped with very thin strips of cucumber. They looked quite striking and tasted delicious. I also loved the miniature chocolate brownies on the top tier, which were so decadent they were like eating pure chocolate fudge. A surprise favourite was the choux pastry, which, when you bit into it, was filled with a salted caramel custard. Winner!

Close up of the brownie...making me hungry all over again!

Close up of the brownie...making me hungry all over again!

There’s a traditional tea menu, served in large china teapots, and also a very extensive mocktails menu. You can opt for alcohol, but it is very expensive in Dubai and we found it was fairly unnecessary given how many other delicious drinks were on offer. The meal concludes with the female guests being given a small takeaway box of chocolates and the men being given the bill. Excellent. 

We took a few final shots of the view and left Atmosphere on a real, dare I say it...high!

 


Easter in Italy by Hannah Foster

Easter in Rome - a little bit crazy!

Easter in Rome - a little bit crazy!

Flu has taken me out of work, and writing blogs, for several weeks, but I knew this week that I was better when I successfully baked a round of double chocolate chip cookies (Hummingbird bakery’s recipe – it’s the best!). I’ve written about this before, but I really do believe baking can be a litmus test for how you’re feeling and where you are mentally. Since I managed to slip into my yoga-zen mode while baking (I had the flat to myself) and the cookies taste pretty damn awesome (even if I say so myself…taste testing is obligatory), I know I am well again.

And since I am back baking, I figured I was well overdue for some blogging too. London is absolutely full of delicious foodie places – Hawksmoor (not just steak) and Nordic Bakery (cinnamon buns!) being two of my latest finds – but my and Ed’s trip to Italy over Easter was a truly standout foodie experience.

I love Italy. Partly it’s the food, the sunny weather, the well-dressed people and stylish architecture, but also it is because Italians seem to get as excited as I do about delicious food.  Plus Italian cuisine regularly features some of my very favourite staples – cheese, chocolate, gnocchi, pasta (and all carbs really), ice-cream, pesto, pastry, custard, and cheese. Yes, I said cheese twice.

We left London in the afternoon and were in Venice at our hotel for a late dinner. We stayed on the island of Murano, where the glass blowers traditionally lived and worked, which is about twenty minutes via water taxi from the main island. During the day it is buzzing with tourists, but at night it is very quiet. This left us with limited dinner options, but did give us a very good night’s sleep because it was so quiet and dark around the hotel. The city really does look like a series of postcards, but it is also incredibly touristy and rammed full of Americans taking photos with huge cameras. We had some excellent desserts and gelato in Venice – at Grom (gelato), Il Doge (crepes and gelato) and a buzzing bakery called Fuori – but overall I wasn’t blown away by the food. We fell into too many tourist traps and I also made the mistake of ordering pizza in Venice. Apparently there has been a law in place for many years banning wood fired ovens in the city. So unless the restaurant you go to has been around for a very long time and they specifically advertise having one, I would not recommend ordering pizza in Venice.

Rome, however, is a whole other story and we did have a superb pizza there in the chic Trastevere area, which is just over the river from the main tourist sites. The pizza – a classic tomato, buffalo mozzarella and fresh basil – featured Pachino tomatoes. These are a very tasty variety, which have an almost herbal aftertaste.  I discovered that they’re a bit controversial though as a few years ago there were allegations that the mafia had taken over production of these special tomatoes and were driving up the price. Some celebrities in Italy called on Italians to boycott them.

Hotel's water taxi waiting to take us from Murano to the main island in Venice

Hotel's water taxi waiting to take us from Murano to the main island in Venice

Trastevere is possibly my favourite area of Rome and it really delivered on our last night in the city, when we had dinner at the Michelin-starred Glass Hostaria. Unlike most restaurants in Rome, the decor there is minimalist and modern. We had a five course degustation there – a vegetarian one for me and a standard one for Ed. Each dish was really beautiful, but the standout of the evening was a pasta dish, which I believe was the best pasta I have ever eaten in my life. I know, that is a very big call to make.

It was a ravioli with an almost liquid filling of 60 month aged parmesan, served in a light butter sauce with shaved black truffles. It was very simple, with just a few ingredients, but those ingredients were insanely delicious. It was salty and umami from the parmesan, buttery and rich, yet earthy from the truffles. The pasta was super-thin and soft and almost melted away as you ate it. It was an act of true love that I let Ed try some of this dish. He agreed it was the dish of the night, and the trip.

The incredible truffle pasta

The incredible truffle pasta

My coconut, white chocolate and tropical fruit dessert at Glass Hostaria

My coconut, white chocolate and tropical fruit dessert at Glass Hostaria

Our foodie adventures continue again in earnest next weekend, when we are spending a long weekend in Germany, in the Black Forest region.

 

Xox Hannah

Review: High tea at The Ritz London by Hannah Foster

My excitement built as soon as I saw this sign!

My excitement built as soon as I saw this sign!

Last weekend, Ed and I had high tea at The Ritz. I’ve wanted to have high tea here for more than five years, but have always found it booked out months in advance of any trips I did to London.

Happily, it absolutely lived up to my high expectations. This is, quite possibly, the pinnacle of high tea experiences (Jolly good! Rah rah rah!).

The Ritz hotel is all-out glitz and glam – soaring ceilings, gold leaf everywhere, doormen in tails and huge displays of red roses (for Valentine’s Day).  The dress code is strict – jackets and ties for men and no jeans, singlets or sneakers. Everyone being dressed up definitely helps make it feel like more of an occasion. Plus, I think I’d feel quite out of place being served high tea, on a silver stand, by waiters wearing tails, if I was wearing a tracksuit!

Because it was Valentine’s Day, we had a glass of sparking to start with and then our sandwiches and cakes arrived on a silver three-tier stand. The vegetarian selection of finger sandwiches was: cucumber with cream cheese and dill, egg, cheddar and onion jam, hummus and rocket and salad. Ed had ham and smoked salmon in place of my hummus and salad sandwiches. The cucumber was really good, with super thin shavings of cucumber. I also really liked the cheddar cheese sandwiches, which were made with semi-dried tomato flavoured bread.

Once we’d finished our sandwiches and wine, tea arrived in large silver teapots. I had lemon verbena and Ed had Russian Caravan. At the same time, plain and raisin scones were delivered to the table, replacing our now empty plates of sandwiches on the tiered stand.

Now, this is a BIG CALL people, so get ready…I think The Ritz’s scones were the best scones I have ever eaten! They were the perfect size to hold in your hand, warm, fluffy and yet with some substance. They were served with a rich strawberry jam and super thick clotted cream. I think the cream alone would have put them in my top five scone experiences (yes, I have a top five scone experiences…).

I did have to make a strategic call though and only eat one scone, because there were a lot of other cakes to get through. Not only did we have the individual cakes on the top tier of our stand, but there was also a cake trolley which came past our table, offering slices of a rhubarb and ginger tart and a chocolate hazelnut layer cake. On the tiered stand were: a lemon curd macaron, a white chocolate and orange tart, two brownie mousse cakes and a coconut cream filled macaroon. The lemon curd macaron was a surprising highlight for me, one of the best macarons I’ve had. It sort of tasted like eating a super light lemon meringue pie. The coconut macaroon was fine, but didn’t really appeal to either of us, but every cake was beautifully presented and perfectly executed.

High tea at The Ritz in London really is the epitome of old-school British style. It’s incredibly proper and privileged. Ed and I joked that not wearing a jacket or dropping a sugar cube on the floor would get us immediately deported. But, as we sipped tea and ate our cakes off beautiful forget-me-not patterned china, it was also a nice reminder and celebration of how well we have adapted to and embraced life in London. We’ve now been here nearly 6 months and we are still loving it, despite the occasional sub-zero temperatures!

A good shot of Ed, and the all-important tiered stand!

A good shot of Ed, and the all-important tiered stand!

The Dorchester spa experience by Hannah Foster

For my birthday this year, my sister gave me a voucher to use at The Dorchester's spa. I've written about The Dorchester for highteasociety, when Ed and I went for high tea there, and earlier this week I finally used my birthday voucher to have a Signature Massage at the hotel's spa. 

The spa is located below the hotel's lobby, so the entry is through the hotel's main lobby, which was still beautifully decorated with Christmas lights and huge Christmas trees. The spa itself is actually quite tucked away and I wasn't sure I was going the right way at first, but luckily there are about a billion Dorchester staff around who are happy to direct you. 

On arrival, before I even mentioned my name, I was greeted with 'You must be Miss Foster! Welcome to the Dorchester spa.' Oh yes, I thought, this is a very good start.

The entry to the spa

The entry to the spa

I was ushered to a little lounge area where I filled in the usual contact details and medical survey. Then I was taken to the women's change room and given a key to my locker, which held slippers and a white fluffy Dorchester robe. Only at the Dorchester would you find a large safe inside every locker - for all those priceless jewels I wear, of course! 

A safe in my locker

A safe in my locker

I was then shown the lounge area where I was told I should wait for my masseuse once I'd changed. I happily did so and then padded out to the lounge area, where chilled water flavoured with rose petals and cucumber (actually very nice!) and a selection of magazines awaited me. I wasn't waiting long though before my masseuse introduced herself and I followed her through breezy white corridors to the treatment room. The 1h25 massage was incredibly relaxing and included a head massage and a foot and hand massage, all of which I love. It also included hot stone massage, which I am always kind of nervous about at first, but then really enjoy. The massage overall was maybe a bit more gentle than I normally like, but I am used to mostly a remedial style (at the wonderful Milk & Honey back in North Melbourne), rather than full relaxation. If you have specific issues or serious back pain, this might not be the massage for you, but if you just want to completely relax and drift into an almost meditative state for an hour and a half, it is the perfect choice. The treatment room itself was small, but a good temperature and nice and dark. Plus they played soft classical music, which I much prefer to ocean or forest sound tracks. 

After the massage I was taken to yet another lounge areas, the relaxation zone, which was stuffed with super comfy velvet armchairs. I was given a glass of coconut water and an almond and pistachio biscotti. It was nearly dinner time, so I definitely could have eaten a lot more biscotti - they were delicious! There was only one other person in the relaxation zone while I was there. I was invited to stay there as long as I liked (within reason - I did consider camping out there forever...) and also to use the shower and steam room facilities. 

The showers at the spa are incredible and possibly a destination in their own right. Each shower is the size of a small bathroom. They're lined with tiny very pale blue glass tiles and lit with warm low level lighting that's built into the shower walls. There are three shower heads - a ridiculously large rainfall shower head, a normal looking shower head that is actually high pressure, and a shower head on the end of a hose which you can detach from the wall. Fluffy white towels, bottles of water and fresh roses await you in the change rooms when you finally drag yourself out of the shower. 

I also really appreciated the provision of BaByliss hairdryers and haircare products in the change rooms, so you can look leaving as good as you feel. The staff are all lovely and not at all snobby, though I'm sure they deal with VIPs and celebrities on a daily basis. 

While obviously very expensive, if you're lucky enough to receive a voucher like I was, or are looking for something decadent to do in London for a special occasion, this is definitely one of my top picks.

xox Hannah

Lounge where I waited for my masseuse

Lounge where I waited for my masseuse

Changing room dressing table

Changing room dressing table

Dressing table close up with fresh roses

Dressing table close up with fresh roses

 

What's up your sleeve, or in your pocket, for 2016? by Hannah Foster

I had an interesting dream a few nights ago. Yes, it’s going to be one of those blogs – I mean, this is a bit of an introspective blog about the start of a new year, with (almost) no sugar-coma or travel related content.

So the dream I had is a version of one that I’m aware a lot of people have. It’s the I-haven’t-prepared-for-something-very-important (like exams) and-they’re-about-to-start-or-are-in-progress dream. If you don’t know what I’m taking about, well, lucky you.

Anyway, this particular version of the dream involves me turning up to a ballet class, which I did as a child, to find I haven’t learnt any of the choreography and the performance starts in about two minutes. This time in the dream I was an adult, and I’d turned up to the performance venue, but same-same…so far.

Everyone was backstage hairspraying and lipsticking and getting into costumes. A guy in a headset and mic was ushering groups of people on stage and troupes of girls and women in various themed costumes were hanging around chatting loudly. I was in an adults class performance and we were dressed in Christmas elf suits. We even had those funny curly-toed boots made out of felt, which ingeniously slipped on over our ballet shoes.

I stood in the wings, side-stage, with the rest of my dance class and madly tried to think of a way out of the situation. I apparently did not know a single step of the choreography, but, with the audience waiting and my classmates expecting me to join them, I didn’t have a lot of options. So I reasoned that what I would do was pick a position at the back of the stage, behind a few other people, and just copy them. Sure, I’d be a second or two late and out of time, but it was better than nothing. Basically, my plan was to hide behind the largest or tallest person I could find on stage and follow everyone else for the two and a half grueling minutes of the song.

I stepped on to the brightly lit stage with the other elf-women and we stood in a sort of V shape on stage. Everyone pliéd. I pliéd, a second or so later. I tried to focus on the women in front of me. But, as the dance went on, I started to notice a lot of the other people on stage also didn’t really know the steps, or were getting them wrong. One woman I was trying to follow actually stopped and turned around and looked at me, hoping I’d remember the next bit in the choreography. By half way into the pop-song Christmas carol we were dancing to, we’d all forgotten the steps and were variously leaping, bending and smiling awkwardly at the mass of faces in the audience in front of us.

Sensing we needed something to get us through the rest of the number, I stepped forward, reached into the pockets of my elf costume (yes, elf costumes have pockets) and pulled out a big handful of wrapped chocolates, which I threw out into the audience (I did say there would be some sugar related content). The audience reacted well to this, scrabbling over the chocolates and cheering me on. All the other women in my dance troupe then started pulling chocolates out of their pockets and throwing them into the audience, instead of struggling through the remainder of the choreography. Given the Christmassy theme, throwing little gifts out to the audience seemed entirely appropriate and we left the stage to applause, with apparently no-one noticing that we’d forgotten most of our dance steps.

This was a real change to the normal format of my sweat-inducing forgotten-to-prepare dreams and, I think, a good omen for 2016.

So, since it is that time of year, here are my eight goals (dare I say resolutions?) for 2016. Like most new year resolutions, I am sure to fail or forget a few, but I figure sharing them here might help. Feel free to take/adapt or ignore them in any way you like:

1.     Don’t let fear mean you end up just copying everyone else.

2.     Be generous and give it everything you’ve got.

3.     Fake it ‘til you make it.

4.     When things go wrong, step forwards, take responsibility and make them right.

5.     Smile like you’re on stage.

6.     Pick outfits that have pockets.

7.     Don’t forget that no-one really knows what steps are next (and that is fine).

8.     If all else fails, try chocolate.

Happy new year everyone!

Xox Hannah

My last resolution should be fairly easy to keep...chocolate mouse with chocolate shards and lime sorbet in Paris last month

My last resolution should be fairly easy to keep...chocolate mouse with chocolate shards and lime sorbet in Paris last month

The ups and Downtons of Christmas by Hannah Foster

December has been a very busy month for us - two hemispheres, three continents and four countries (England, France, UAE and Australia). After some great trips catching up with friends and family, we decided a break that involved lots of sleeping in and eating, and not much else, was definitely in order. 

This year is Ed and my first Christmas as 'Christmas orphans' - spending the holidays away from family, in the UK. Given this, we wanted to really embrace the fact that we were going to be having a cold (sadly not white) Christmas in England for the first time. Everything in the UK definitely feels more Christmassy than in Australia. We woke up on Christmas morning, for example, to frost covering our windows - a sight I'd previously only really seen on the front of cheesy Christmas cards. Hot food and mulled wine taste better when it is bracingly cold outside, and things like log fires, Christmas carol lyrics and tacky Christmas jumpers make a hell of a lot more sense here than in Australia. 

On Christmas Eve, Ed and I took a train from London to Ipswich in Suffolk (North East of London) and then on to the little village of Kesgrave, where Kesgrave Hall is located. Surrounded by woods and an expansive lawn, the 23-room hotel used to be a school before being renovated and turned into a boutique hotel about 5 years ago. 

So far our stay here has been decadent and delightful. We have eaten so much food, including a full English breakfast with champagne on Christmas morning and a sit-down lunch in the hotel restaurant. Meals come in country-sized portions here and everything has been delicious. And the real plus of having Christmas lunch at the hotel restaurant? You don't have to wash up afterwards, but you can still just stumble upstairs to your room for a nap afterwards!

A traditional roast turkey lunch course for Ed

A traditional roast turkey lunch course for Ed

My dessert - mango cheesecake with passionfruit ice-cream and tropical fruit salsa

My dessert - mango cheesecake with passionfruit ice-cream and tropical fruit salsa

Speaking of naps, our four-course lunch on Christmas day meant we unpatriotically managed to sleep through the Queen's Speech. However, I was definitely awake for the last ever episode of Downton Abbey on Christmas night. I'll avoid any spoilers here since a lot of people might not have seen the finale yet. I'll just say I enjoyed it and it was a crowdpleaser, as is almost always the case for the Christmas specials. 

Anyway, I'll sign off now and wish everyone a happy holidays or a Merry Christmas. I hope that, wherever it was and however you celebrated, your day was full of love and laughter (Ed in a elf hat over lunch ensured mine was!).

xox Hannah

Weekend in Paris and Dinosaurs in London by Hannah Foster

Last weekend Ed and I took advantage of the fact that we now live in Europe. We left work early on the Friday, hopped on the train and arrived in Paris in time for dinner. Popping up out of the metro right in front of the Arc De Triomphe, all lit up in a warm yellow light, was pretty spectacular. After an 'Arc De Selfie' as Ed termed it, we checked in to our hotel and then jumped back on the metro to have dinner at Maceo

Maceo is a fairly traditional French restaurant near the Louvre with one very important difference: it had not one, but two vegetarian options on its menu. Given how difficult it is to find an old-school high end restaurant with good vegetarian options in Paris, I booked this place as soon as we decided to come to Paris. It was a difficult decision about whether to come to Paris as planned so soon after the Paris attacks, but in the end I'm very glad we did. Our waitress at Maceo was lovely and had excellent English. We chatted about where we were from and how we were unsure whether it was the right thing to do to weekend in Paris. She assured us it was, that Parisians just wanted to get on with life and also encourage tourists to come back. Her normally packed restaurant was only half full. I can see why it was normally full. It was a great meal at Maceo - typically French with small but very rich and beautifully presented dishes. I had a vegetable soup with poached quail egg to start, gnocchi cooked with butter and roasted autumn fruit for mains and a chocolate mousse served with lime sorbet (a oddly good combination) for dessert. 

Some art and culture at the Louvre

Some art and culture at the Louvre

In the morning I downloaded the David Lebovitz Paris Pastry app and then dragged Ed many blocks for highly rated croissants. We dipped them in my super rich and thick hot chocolate and then headed to the Champs Elysees for some shopping and to see the Christmas markets and then we walked down to the Louvre. It started to rain while we were at the Louvre but it had stopped by about 6pm, so it was perfect timing really. We caught up for wines with some of Ed's friends who are now living in Paris, shopped, ate a lot more cake (Laduree and Demontel were highlights) and then waddled back to the train on Sunday afternoon. 

Adventures have not been limited to Paris, of course. I have also enjoyed some excellent meals - especially at the famous Ottolengi and its new sister Nopi - and plenty of cake in London in the last few weeks (special mention goes to Hummingbird Bakery's chocolate malt layer cake).

Much deliciousness

Much deliciousness

Ed and I also went to the Natural History Museum a few weeks ago. They have an impressive dinosaur bone collection housed in an immense and beautiful building. The majority of the displays are quite old school and static (stuffed animals in glass cases - eww), but the dinosaurs are worth seeing, as are the new areas on earthquakes and volcanos (hello year 8 geography!) and the De Beers sponsored section on diamonds and other pretty things that come from the earth. I was also really interested to learn about a couple of very early dinosaur collectors and donors to the museum who were women. I have this image of these women digging around in the sand after plesiosaur fossils in full corset and bonnet. Go girl! 

Speaking of digging around in the sand (or the rough)...we also managed to fit in a spot of golf in London. Indoor mini-golf, that is. Our friend Tim found a great pop up bar that runs mini golf inside a disused tunnel section of the tube. It's uber cool and oddly addictive. After a less than ideal start, I actually really got into it, finishing the game with a satisfying hole-in one!

I'll be back in Australia for a flying visit to Queensland and Melbourne in about a week. I can't wait to see friends and family, and soak up a whole lot of warm weather!

xox Hannah

Tunnel mini golf - what else? 

Tunnel mini golf - what else?